Gil Brandt

Gil Brandt, a highly-regarded personnel administrator, spent 29 years with the Dallas Cowboys. Gil helped grow the Cowboys into one of the most powerful and popular sports franchises in America. He oversaw the drafting of eight (8) Cowboys’ players who are now enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Brandt was one of the first to use computers for scouting and talent evaluations, and also the first to use psychological tests to evaluate mental makeup of prospects under pressure. Gil’s efforts led to the building of the NFL Scouting Combine to streamline evaluation processes.

Darren Woodson

Darren Woodson retired as the Dallas Cowboys all-time tackle leader, posting 1,350 through his 12-year playing career. Originally drafted in the second round of the 1992 draft, coming out of school as a linebacker, Woodson made the switch to safety and flourished in all phases of his career. He was a key part of a defense that won three Super Bowl Championships. A five-time Pro Bowler, Woodson is the only player in Cowboys history to play under five head coaches – Jimmy Johnson, Barry Switzer, Chan Gailey, Dave Campo and Bill Parcells. Until the year he finished playing, Woodson was a regular on special teams units, ranking second in club history with 134 career special teams tackles. Woodson was inducted into the Ring of Honor at halftime of the Cowboys-Seahawks game on Nov. 1, 2015.

      Charles Haley

      Charles Haley is the only player in NFL history to win five Super Bowls (two with San Francisco and three with Dallas). He arrived in Dallas after six seasons as a pass rushing threat for the 49ers. Upon his arrival, he was moved to defensive end and had back-to-back double-digit sack seasons (1994-95). He was a member of 10 division championship teams in his 12 NFL seasons and played for a team with winning record through each of his first 11 years. In 63 games played for Dallas, Haley racked up 34.0 sacks and through his 169-game career, he amassed 100.5 sacks. Inducted during halftime of the Cowboys-Seahawks game on Nov. 6, 2011.

          Drew Pearson

          In 11 seasons with the Dallas Cowboys, Drew Pearson rose from unknown to legend. A former undrafted free agent, Pearson was named to the All-Decade Team of the 1970s as he earned a niche as one of the top clutch receivers in football history. He led the team in receptions and receiving yards four consecutive seasons (1974-77) and recorded two 1,000-yard campaigns. He has a resume filled with memorable game winning catches. In 1980 he became the all-time leading receiver in receptions, and in 1983, he took the top spot for receiving yards. He is littered through team and league postseason record books, including a catch in a club-record 22 consecutive playoff games. He was a key member of the 1977 Super Bowl XXII Championship squad. Inducted during halftime of the Cowboys Seahawks game on Nov. 6, 2011.

              Larry Allen

              Larry Allen finished his Dallas Cowboys career as one of the most decorated offensive players in Dallas Cowboys and NFL history. He was named to more Pro Bowls (10) than any other offensive player in Cowboys history. He earned his 11th trip in 2006 while finishing his career with the San Francisco 49ers. He was named All-Pro seven times, six-times at guard and once at tackle. With his selection to the Pro Bowl at tackle in 1998, he became just the third player in league history to be selected to the all-star game at more than one offensive line position. In 12 seasons in Dallas, he played all but one offensive line position (center). Was a key part of the 1995 Super Bowl champion team. Inducted during halftime of the Cowboys-Seahawks game on Nov. 6, 2011. Elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2013.

                  Emmitt Smith

                  Emmitt Smith retired as the NFL’s all-time rushing leader with 18,335 yards and scored more rushing touchdowns (164) than any other player in NFL history. Smith was selected to the Pro Bowl eight times, won four NFL rushing titles (‘91, ‘92. ‘93 and ‘95), three Super Bowl titles, and a league (1993) and Super Bowl (XXVIII) MVP award. Smith broke Walter Payton’s NFL rushing record at Texas Stadium on Oct. 27, 2002 on an 11-yard run in the fourth quarter against the Seattle Seahawks. Smith was inducted into the Ring of Honor with Troy Aikman and Michael Irvin on Monday Sept. 19, 2005 at halftime of the Cowboys-Redskins game. Smith was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010.

                      Michael Irvin

                      Michael “The Playmaker” Irvin helped lead the Dallas Cowboys to six division titles and three Super Bowl rings before a spinal injury cut his playing career short. Irvin was the team’s top receiver for eight consecutive seasons and retired as the Cowboys all-time leader in receptions (750), receiving yards (1,315). As a five-time Pro Bowl selection, between 1991-98, Irvin has two more appearance than any other receiver in club history. Irvin was inducted into the Ring of Honor with Emmitt Smith and Troy Akmin on Monday Sept. 19, 2005 at halftime of the Cowboys-Redskins game. Irvin was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2007.

                          Troy Aikman

                          Troy Aikman joined the Cowboys as the first overall pick in the 1989 NFL Draft out of UCLA. After guiding the franchise to three Super Bowl titles, Aikman retired holding or tied for 47 club passing records, including career attempts (4,715), completions (2,898), passing yards (32,942), touchdowns (165) and completion percentage (61.5%). At the time, he was the winningest quarterback of any decade, having finished his career with 94 regular season wins in the 90s. Aikman was six-time Pro Bowler and the MVP of Super Bowl XXVII. He was inducted into the Ring of Honor with Emmitt Smith and Michael Irvin on Monday Sept. 19, 2005 at halftime of the Cowboys-Redskins game. Aikman was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.

                           

                              Cliff Harris

                              Nicknamed “Captain Crash,” Cliff Harris went undrafted in 1970 out of tiny Ouachita Baptist in Arkansas, but he eventually found the starting lineup as a rookie and went on to start nine consecutive years. He was named to six Pro Bowls and four All-NFL teams, and he was a member of two Super Bowl winning teams. Harris was at his best in the postseason, finishing his career with six interceptions in 21 playoff games. Harris was a member of the 1970s NFL all-decade team. Harris was inducted into the Ring of Honor at halftime of the Cowboys-N.Y. Giants game on Oct. 10, 2004.

                                  Rayfield Wright

                                  Rayfield Wright is the only offensive lineman in the Ring of Honor. A seventh-round draft choice, Wright made the conversion from tight end to tackle and became the Cowboys most decorated offensive lineman of the 1970s. During his 13-year career, the “Big Cat” was selected to the Pro Bowl six times, named All-Pro on four occasions and was on two Super Bowl-winning teams in the 1970s. He was the leader of Dallas offensive line units that produced the club’s first five 1,000-yard individual rushing seasons. Wright was inducted in the Ring of Honor at halftime of the Cowboys-N.Y. Giants game on Oct. 10, 2004. Wright was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006.